Working together to strengthen and support noxious weed management efforts in Montana.

MSU Weed Post

Hawkweed Nomenclature & Identification – February 2013 MSU Weed Post

Friday, February 1st, 2013

 

The hawkweeds are difficult taxonomically and morphologically due to hybridization and agamospermy (the production of seeds without fertilization) .  So we hope this Weed Post  will provide you with a variety of resources to approach the hawkweeds with more confidence.  Download February 2013 MSU Weed Post

Visit the MWCA Weed ID page for details about orange hawkweed or meadow hawkweed complex. Contact your local weed coordinator if you think you find it in your area.


Hawkweeds – January 2013 MSU Weed Post

Tuesday, January 1st, 2013

 

MSU is starting the third year of the Weed Post with information on hawkweeds. Download the January 2013 MSU Weed Post

Visit the MWCA Weed ID page for details about orange hawkweed or meadow hawkweed complex. Contact your local weed coordinator if you think you find it in your area.


Applying Biological Control Methods For Weed Management – MSU Weed Post

Sunday, December 30th, 2012

 

Biological control agents are organisms (e.g. insects, nematodes or fungi) that can be used to manage large weed populations. Typically these organisms are natural enemies of the target species in their native continent and are introduced to their new range following testing to ensure they do not harm non-target plants. Biocontrol agents have been approved and released for several weed species in Montana. Download the complete post to find out the ins and outs of biocontrol from beginning to end.

This publication is produced by Montana State University Extension and the Montana Noxious Weed Education Campaign


Toadflax – MSU November Weed Post

Thursday, November 29th, 2012

 

This month MSU is  featuring Dalmatian and yellow toadflax, including information on their hybridization.  Didn’t know they could hybridize???  Well, then there is definitely something new for you in this month’s post from Montana State University.  Download the  November 2012 MSU Weed Post on toadflax.

Visit the MWCA Weed ID page for details about Dalmatian Toadflax and Yellow Toadflax.  Contact your local weed coordinator if you think you find it in your area.


Weeds and Wildfire – October 2012 MSU Weed Post

Monday, October 1st, 2012

 

The October Weed Post, featuring weed management after fire is available from MSU.  The hot, dry, and fiery summer experienced in much of Montana and many other states in the Rocky Mountain region has prompted a great deal of interest in weed management following wildfire. Weed response to fire is dependent on many factors including propagule pressure (reproductive structures like seeds and root fragments, both above- and belowground), time since invasion, competition with desired vegetation, disturbance history, rainfall patterns, soil characteristics, plus the actual dynamics of the fire itself (e.g. temperature, duration, season), and the type of plant community where the fire burned, for example mountain grasslands versus lodgepole or ponderosa pine forest. Weed response to fire also depends on the regeneration strategy of the weed species of concern. Research suggests that most post-fire plant cover originates from resprouting. So, weeds that resprout from vegetative structures may respond quickly following fire as compared to weeds that have to regenerate from seeds.

Download the October 2012 MSU Weed Post – Weeds and Wildfire


Rangeland Revegetation Revisited: Do short-term results predict long-term outcomes of revegetation? – MSU September Weed Post

Saturday, September 1st, 2012

 

The September Weed Post  features a recent publication on the long-term outcomes of revegetation on spotted-knapweed infested rangeland in western Montana.  I hope you will find it thought-provoking and useful.    Download and this new publication from Montana State University – September 2012 MSU Monthly Weed Post