Working together to strengthen and support noxious weed management efforts in Montana.

Weed Articles

MSU July Weed Post – Narrowleaf Hawksbeard

Tuesday, October 29th, 2013

 

This Weed Post features narrowleaf hawksbeard (Crepis tectorum).  We don’t know very much about this weed, but we’ve put together some basic information, including anecdotal information on control from people in northeastern Montana who have been dealing with it for the past couple years.

It is not on the Montana Noxious Weed List.

Read the complete July 2013 MSU Weed Post with pictures and maps.


MSU June Weed Post – Distribution of Knotweeds

Wednesday, June 19th, 2013

 

Abstract:

Dr. John Gaskin and colleagues have been researching the distribution of knotweed genotypes throughout the western U.S. and Canada. Knowing the distribution of different genotypes insures that all of the genetic diversity represented by knotweed invasions will be present in host-specificity tests of current and proposed biological control agents, thus improving their effectiveness and reducing risk to closely related non-target species. Dr. John Gaskin provided the update below about this research.

Read the complete June 2013 MSU Weed Post with pictures and maps.


MSU May Weed Post – New Invaders

Friday, May 17th, 2013

 

The May Weed Post  features three “new” invasive plants—white bryony, big-headed knapweed, and medusahead.  These exotic species aren’t “new” to North America and are even on the noxious weed list in some western states.  But they might be “new” to you, so here is an opportunity to learn more about them so if you ever come across them in the field you’ll be more likely to know what they are.

Download and read all about the new invaders in the May MSU Weed Post

If you have suggestions for any other “new” weeds you’d like to know more about in future Weed Posts, please let Jane Mangold at MSU know.


MSU April Weed Post – Managing Cheatgrass

Monday, April 15th, 2013

 

The April Weed Post summarizes some recent research on managing cheatgrass with imazapic on range, pasture, and CRP in Montana.

Introduction: Cheatgrass is a winter annual grass. Most cheatgrass germinates and emerges in the fall, overwinters as a seedling and resumes growth early in the spring, taking advantage of early season soil moisture. Spraying cheatgrass seedlings when they are most susceptible to herbicide is critical for effective control, but timing of applications can be complex because sometimes cheatgrass seedling emergence can continue fall through spring, depending on precipitation patterns. The herbicide imazapic (Plateau®) has been the focus of research and on-the-ground management of cheatgrass in many areas of the western U.S. Imazapic has both soil and foliar activity and is labeled for pre- and post-emergent application. Imazapic has been applied by both researchers and range managers in Montana with mixed results.

Download a complete copy of the April MSU Weed Post


MSU March Weed Post – Dyer’s Woad

Thursday, March 7th, 2013

 

The March Weed Post covering dyer’s woad.  Dyer’s woad is a great example of a weed that Montana has targeted for EDRR, and the great news is that we are succeeding thanks to the efforts of the Dyer’s Woad Cooperative Project.  Read more about it in the March 2013-03 MSU Dyer’s Woad Weed Post.

Visit the MWCA Weed ID page for details about Dyer’s Woad. Contact your local weed coordinator if you think you find it in your area.

For more information on the Dyer’s Woad Task Force contact Amber Burch, 683-3790


Hawkweed Nomenclature & Identification – February 2013 MSU Weed Post

Friday, February 1st, 2013

 

The hawkweeds are difficult taxonomically and morphologically due to hybridization and agamospermy (the production of seeds without fertilization) .  So we hope this Weed Post  will provide you with a variety of resources to approach the hawkweeds with more confidence.  Download February 2013 MSU Weed Post

Visit the MWCA Weed ID page for details about orange hawkweed or meadow hawkweed complex. Contact your local weed coordinator if you think you find it in your area.


Hawkweeds – January 2013 MSU Weed Post

Tuesday, January 1st, 2013

 

MSU is starting the third year of the Weed Post with information on hawkweeds. Download the January 2013 MSU Weed Post

Visit the MWCA Weed ID page for details about orange hawkweed or meadow hawkweed complex. Contact your local weed coordinator if you think you find it in your area.


Toadflax – MSU November Weed Post

Thursday, November 29th, 2012

 

This month MSU is  featuring Dalmatian and yellow toadflax, including information on their hybridization.  Didn’t know they could hybridize???  Well, then there is definitely something new for you in this month’s post from Montana State University.  Download the  November 2012 MSU Weed Post on toadflax.

Visit the MWCA Weed ID page for details about Dalmatian Toadflax and Yellow Toadflax.  Contact your local weed coordinator if you think you find it in your area.


Tall Buttercup – MSU July Monthly Weed Post

Friday, July 6th, 2012

 

Tall buttercup is one of those weeds that can be toxic to grazing animals, especially cattle.   Animals usually avoid it because it has a bitter taste.   Learn more about this weed and how to identify it,  by reading the new Monthly Weed Post.  Download and this new publication from Montana State University.

Visit the MWCA Weed ID page for details about tall buttercup. Contact your local weed coordinator if you think you find it in your area.


Perennial Pepperweed – MSU May Monthly Weed Post

Friday, May 4th, 2012

 

Perennial pepperweed has been around for a while in relatively small populations in Montana.  In other parts of the West where this plant has become very problematic, especially in moist habitats.  Let’s keep this potentially invasive plant in check in Montana by properly identifying it and managing it while infestations are mostly small!

Download and this new publication from Montana State University.

Visit the MWCA Weed ID page for details about perennial pepperweed. Contact your local weed coordinator if you think you find it in your area.